Students, a Zoom Session – and Loss

A small group of high school students contacted me recently to ask if I’d host a Zoom session for them and a few of their friends. I had spoken at their school last Fall and they were interested in having a deeper conversation about the benefits and strategies I had shared from my in-school presentation. I was thrilled to hear from them and we set it up with the title of the meeting, “Social Media; Strategy, Execution and Benefit.”

The day came, I fired up Zoom and as the Host, welcomed everyone into the session. To make the session interesting, fun and interactive, I created a few Poll questions around how they use their devices; the apps that command most of their screen-time, and what they look at on their phones, first thing in the morning.

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When everyone was in I locked the room and we were set to go; private and secure. What I thought was going to be 10-15 students turned out to be thirty, from a few different schools. I encouraged everyone to introduce themselves and indicate what school they attended. I walked through a few basic housekeeping rules such as muting their mic, the chat function, hand-raising and designated a co-host (the lead student that contacted me) who would manage the chat while I was speaking and illustrating ideas.

Continue reading “Students, a Zoom Session – and Loss”

Scavenger Hunts and Screen-Time

It was the 1996 annual Halton-wide scavenger hunt and one of our stops was at Easterbrook’s Hotdog stand in Aldershot, on the west side of Burlington. The object we had to find was an obscure menu item on the old board on the wall inside the restaurant.

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Fast forward to 2019 and what does a scavenger hunt, an 84 year-old hotdog stand, social media and screen-time have in common? Lots.

A scavenger hunt has a purpose, an end-point – the win. The team that completes all of the required tasks in the fastest time, wins the race. Its structure is an exercise in efficiency. You have to stay on task, complete each step, and find the object that allows you to begin the next step. Rinse and repeat. You don’t take “scenic routes” or get distracted, or you’re out of the competition. Continue reading “Scavenger Hunts and Screen-Time”